Author: Serapheim Baroulis

EU

Russian House in Dhaka (formerly the Russian Cultural Centre), in cooperation with the National Museum and the Liberation War Affairs Academy, organized an event dedicated to Bangladesh’s 53rd anniversary of independence, ahead of Independence Day on March 26. At the beginning of the ceremony, a minute’s silence was observed to pay respect to the memory of all the martyrs of the Great War of Liberation and to express sincere condolences to the families and friends of the victims of the tragic terrorist attack on Crocus City Hall in Moscow on March 22. Twenty-six freedom fighters from different districts of Bangladesh…

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Kiev, London (25/3 – 50) Kiev is being bombed by the Russians, but despite the dangers the indiscriminate bombing brings, Ukrainians have their humor, and a bit of the “so what” attitude. Let’s call her Maria, because we don’t know her correct name and we don’t want to endanger the young coffee aficionado to targeted Russian attacks targeting the Ukrainian spirit of everything can be fixed with a good cup of coffee. The young Ukrainian barista keeps working despite today’s Russian missile strike destroying large parts of her cafe. “They won’t be able to break us,” Maria tells the reporter…

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As Congress continues to delay aid and Volodymyr Zelensky replaces his top commander, military experts debate the possible outcomes. Long before it was reported, at the end of January, that Volodymyr Zelensky had decided to replace his popular Army chief, Valery Zaluzhny, the Ukrainian counter-offensive of 2023 had devolved from attempted maneuvers to mutual recriminations. The arrows pointed in multiple directions: Zelensky seemed to think that his commander-in-chief was being defeatist; Zaluzhny, that his President was refusing to face facts. And there were arguments, too, between Ukraine and its allies. In a two-part investigation in the Washington Post, in early December, U.S. officials…

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Giant portraits of President Emomali Rahmon adorn even the most nondescript buildings in Tajikistan’s capital of Dushanbe. Throughout the country, his sayings are featured on posters and billboards. Their ubiquitous presence underscores the consolidation of power by Rahmon – officially described as “Founder of Peace and Unity, Leader of the Nation” – since he emerged victorious from the 1992-1997 Tajikistan civil war that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union. After three decades in power, he has established himself as an absolute ruler with no tolerance for dissent. Rahmon’s bid to centralize control includes efforts to silence political opponents, human rights activists, and independent…

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Animals with human attributes have traditionally been a trope reserved for Disney movies or dystopian sci-fi projections, but a new discovery suggests that life can do a pretty convincing imitation of art. Over the summer, researchers spotted a dolphin off the coast of Greece which had developed strange, hooked thumbs carved out of its flippers. The scientists, from the Pelagos Cetacean Research Institute, said they spotted the unusual animal on two occasions as they conducted boat surveys in the region. Alexandros Frantzis, president of the research institute, noted that despite the unique shape of its flippers, the mammal kept up with the rest of its…

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Skyrocketing interest rates around the globe have culminated in a worldwide housing crisis as economies deal with the problem of burgeoning unaffordable housing. Germany, Europe’s largest economy, has been dealing with slower construction amid stagnant demand, causing the property market to shrink rapidly. “The homebuilding or construction sector is the first victim of higher interest rates,” Carsten Brzeski, global head of macro research and chief economist for Germany at ING Group, told CNBC. Brzeski pointed to increased costs of material and energy as well as overall financing costs as the key reasons for the collapse. Don’t Miss: Plummeting Housing Demand…

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School systems in French Polynesia and New Caledonia are attempting to revitalize vernacular languages that were suppressed under French colonialism Pardon my French—but French imperialism is still potent as hell. With a colonial record that spans continents and centuries, France has imprinted itself in a number of societies as a cultural “first class.” As a result, its expansionist legacy is an ongoing one of neocolonialism-gone-well: twenty-nine countries are those of Francophones, French is one of the world’s favorite lingua francas, and a few overseas territories still sit under its political rule. A correlation between speaking French and being a good citizen is a…

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Macron is calling for unity, but the Israel-Hamas war has sparked a rise in hate crime that threatens a fragile social peace French Jews were only partly reassured when more than 100,000 people, including the prime minister, Élisabeth Borne, and two former presidents, turned out to demonstrate in Paris last month against antisemitism and in defence of the secular republic. Why did the president, Emmanuel Macron, not attend, many asked? Where were the leaders of France’s Muslim community? And where were the cultural, intellectual and sports celebrities so often eager to take a public stance on a worthy cause? Since Hamas fighters poured…

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Art

Rather than ‘shaken, not stirred’, one 17th-century Polish spy would likely ask: ‘Black or with milk?’ Jerzy Kulczycki was not only one of the very first people to open a café in Vienna, but apparently also the first person to come up with adding milk to coffee. Just how did his heroic stance during the Battle of Vienna lead him to become an internationally recognised figure in café culture? Spying on the Grand Vizier Jerzy Franciszek Kulczycki (a.k.a. Georg Franz Kolschitzky) – a Polish nobleman, born in the town of Sambor in today’s Ukraine – led a rather eventful life…

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London (06/11 – 58) France and the United Kingdom (UK) have jointly made a request in favour of Sri Lanka to the court of the Southern District of New York, for a six-month freeze on any litigation in the Hamilton Reserve Bank case until Sri Lanka’s external debt restructuring is completed, the Financial Times reported. Accordingly, last week the two countries filed a joint “amicus curiae” to the New York judge hearing the case, arguing in favour of Sri Lanka’s request for a six-month freeze on any litigation. The co-signatories in their “amicus curiae” want the judge to grant Sri…

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